There Was Never A Black Man On The U.S. $2 Dollar Bill

Declaration_independence

(UPDATED POST, JANUARY 14, 2016)

I would like to clear up an urban myth that has been floating around via online for years now and misinformation regarding whether or not a Black man was on the U.S. $2 dollar bill.

I know there are Black people who are in denial about this sensitive topic, just because you want something to be true that relates to us as Black people, but this unfortunately is not the case and never was. We as Black people have to deal with the truth for what it is and across the board. We can’t make a person or something real that never was real to begin with or make a person or something real that never was real in time in the past or present.

The image that’s shown on the U.S. $2 dollar bill is a depiction and life portrait painting by John Trumbull of “the five-man drafting committee” for the Declaration of Independence. This painting depicts when the first draft of the Declaration of Independence was presented on June 28, 1776 to the Second Continental Congress. On July 4, 1776, the Declaration was officially adopted, it was later signed on August 2, 1776. The original painting hangs in the US Capitol rotunda.

The man who’s assumed Black is not Black on the U.S. $2 dollar bill, but is an white man who was the senator of Pennsylvania Robert Morris, who was a financier, Superintendent of Finance of the United States, who also financed the American Revolution, and is one of the 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence and etc.

My only guess the reason why “Robert Morris” appears a little darker than the rest of the other men on the U.S. $2 dollar bill, is because it was an error when this U.S. $2 dollar bill was originally printed out. But he was definitely an white man just like all the other men on the U.S. $2 dollar bill.

However as I have already reiterate more than once throughout this post, there was never a Black man on the U.S. $ 2 dollar bill depicted whatsoever at all, and neither was a man depicted by the name of “John Hanson Black or White” that appeared on the U.S. $2 dollar bill. They were rich European men only, who owned businesses and owned Slaves. Plain & Simple ! It’s simply an urban myth that’s been floating around online for years now. Anyone can verify this information just base on doing simple and smart research. Instead of ignorantly and arrogantly going by what has been put out there via online with misinformation.

I will only provide two main sources, because much of this information is easy to find if you look in the right places.

http://www.americanrevolution.org/deckey.php (Key To Declaration of Independence)

http://explorepahistory.com/displayimage.php?imgId=1-2-996 (Portrait of Robert Morris)

 

Declaration_independenceThe image that’s shown on the U.S. $2 dollar bill is a depiction and life portrait painting by John Trumbull of “the five-man drafting committee” for the Declaration of Independence. As you can see everyone there are no Black men to be found in this painting.

WG-$2-StampedThe image that’s shown on the U.S. $2 dollar bill is a depiction and life portrait painting by John Trumbull of “the five-man drafting committee” for the Declaration of Independence. http://www.wheels-in-motion.com/WheresGeorge/images/WG-$2-Stamped.jpg (If you click onto link provided you can see the photo more closer).

10580059_157558554609971_5776940682970445888_n
The Black woman who’s pointing her finger in the photo at the man who she thinks is Black on the U.S. $2 dollar bill, is actually a White man and his name is Robert Morris.
2_bill_blackman

Robert Morris is the man who was assumed to be Black on the U.S. $2 dollar bill, is actually a White man. (A much blown up closer version) LOL ! You can’t have a Black face and white hands if your Black. This is another sign this was not a Black man, but simply an error.

 

1-2-996-25-ExplorePAHistory-a0h9u7-a_349This is the man who’s assumed Black on the U.S. $2 dollar bill. Which is Robert Morris as you can see everyone it’s nothing Black about him whatsoever in this life portrait. Simply another urban myth that’s been floating around online for years now. (Robert Morris, by Charles Willson Peale, after Charles Willson Peale, c. 1782.)

 

 

 

 

2 responses to “There Was Never A Black Man On The U.S. $2 Dollar Bill

  1. 50 people in a room, dated back to 1776 and you are telling us no black people was in that room base on that photo.
    you didn’t show any federal gov. stand on the subject and no counter response on John Hanson 1st President of US, of The Acticular of Confederation.
    it hard to understand and beleive one, when very important parts and answers to questions are left out, that would turly help in understanding you r point on the subject.

    Like

    • Stan, First of all most Black people would have been enslaved at that time in 1776 in America. So let’s just use common sense base on the painting, but base on that time no Black person would have had a position of power like that. Also this post is not about John Hanson and I mention his name because this was one of the names pertaining to this story. Also for the record too there was no Black man as the first President of the U.S. once again urban legend and misinformation that has been circulating online for years. Also there was in fact two John Hanson’s a Caucasian one who most Black people confuse with the black John Hanson. The black John Hanson in fact was a Senator during the 1850’s for Liberia in West Afrika he served as a senator for Grand Bassa County. Finally at a later time in another post I will touch on both John Hanson’s.

      https://web.archive.org/web/20120112031740/http://www.rjrmediagroup.com/wordpress_blog/?tag=john-hanson

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hanson_(Liberia)

      Liked by 2 people

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